Organizational Leadership Minor

The organizational leadership minor is open to all baccalaureate students and consists of six courses, three of which are required, for a total of 18 credits. To complete the minor, students will complete three additional specified elective courses that are offered within and outside the Business Management Department.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will gain fundamental knowledge of the nature and function of leadership, team building, and ethics
  • Students will acquire an interdisciplinary appreciation of the importance of leadership across one or more fields of study including politics, history, sociology, health care, and management.
  • Students will develop competencies that will prepare them for further study in organizational behavior and management.

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

Business

Dr. Nanda Viswanathan, Chair
School of Business, Room 329
934-420-2015
business@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2019

Subject to revision

Required:
BUS 209 Teamwork & Team Building
BUS 360 Leadership Theories & Practices
BUS 460 Leadership & Ethics
Electives (3) chosen from the following:
BUS 305 Entrepreneurship
BUS 322 International Management
BUS 311 Organizational Behavior
BUS 379-382 Business Internship I
BUS 479-482 Business Internship II
DEN 409 Dental Hygiene Practicum
ECO 262 Managerial Economics
EGL 322 Leadership in Fact, Fiction and Film
HIS 335 Gender and Technology in Historical Perspective
HIS 332 American Military History
HOR 370 Landscape Professional Practices
MLT 325W Laboratory Management and Informatics
NUR 404 Nurse as Advocate and Change Agent
PHI 205 Ethics
PHI 207 Business Ethics
POL 110 Introduction to Legal Studies
POL 399 New York State Legislative Internship
PSY 330 Organizational Training and Development
SMT 440-443 Sport Management Internship I
SMT 445-448 Sport Management Internship II
SOC 303 Sociology of Work & Occupation

BUS 209 Teamwork and Team Building

The following topics will be discussed and analyzed: teams in organizations, understanding team building and development, working in groups and teams, team roles and processes, being a team leader, and handling team conflict. The culmination of these concepts and functions, referred to as "team forming, storming, norming, and performing," will also be covered. Case studies will be used extensively. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109

BUS 360 Leadership Theories Practices

The following will be covered: definition and significance of leadership; global and cultural contexts of leadership; early theories and practices: the foundations of modern leadership; individual differences and traits and the ability to lead; leadership and "emotional intelligence;" leadership and "the moral compass;" power, influence, and leadership; new models of leadership; leadership of non-profits; and leading change. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109

BUS 460 Leadership and Ethics

This advanced-level business management course covers theories, case studies, and skill development applications relating to effective leadership and ethics. Emphasis will be on the interrelated role of laws, cultural norms, attitudes, moral development, situational circumstances, and technologies as determining effects on ethical leadership. Coursework includes leadership-and ethics related research literature and databases. Note: Students cannot get credit for BUS 460 and 460W; BUS 460W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Business Management Department. Prerequisite(s) BUS 109 or Management course, Senior-level status.

BUS 305 Entrepreneurship

This course covers the process of creating and growing a new business venture through the introduction and development of a business idea. Also covered are the nature and importance of entrepreneurs, international entrepreneurship opportunities, and the development of business and marketing plans. Methods for financing the new venture through the use of case studies and practical applications will be discussed and covered in assignments. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or Department approval.

BUS 322 International Management

This course will examine the critical issues and practices of international management. Emphasis will be placed on the multicultural workforce and worldwide developments. Topics will include planning, political risk, organizing, decision-making, and controlling as pertaining to international management and operations. Students will study human resource/personnel issues concerning selection and repatriation, communication skills, and labor relations in a global context. Ethics and social responsibility as well as future trends of international management will be explored. The course will include student assignments and case studies examining the issues affecting small businesses expanding operations into foreign markets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109, BUS 280

BUS 311 Organizational Behavior

This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communication and dynamics; decision making; causes and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power, and politics in organizations. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for PSY 311. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109, or PSY 101 or permission of department chair.

BUS 379 Business Internship

This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisite(s): Junior-level status, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better

BUS 479 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internships, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level status, Department approval, GPA 3.0.

DEN 409 Dental Hygiene Practicum

This course provides a foundational experience and will involve students in a 40-hour self-directed practicum that is multidimensional in its scope. The specialized areas of interest are expanded to include, but are not limited to, education, research, corporate/business, health care delivery systems, and specialized practice interests. Spring. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene and DEN 407, with a minimum grade of C or higher.

ECO 262 Managerial Economics

This course introduces students to the use of economic methods for managerial decision-making. The focus of the course is on the practical application of economic techniques to business problems, including: the theory of the firm, demand estimation, production functions, cost estimation, market structure, pricing strategy, and game theory. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for ECO 260 Prerequisite(s): ECO 157 and (MTH 117 or 129)

EGL 322 Leadership in Fact, Fiction and Film

Leadership in Fiction, Fact, and Film examines various fiction and non-fiction materials from a business perspective. Students will explore leadership, ethics/values, motivation, interpersonal skills, power/authority, communication, gender roles, empowerment, change, etc., as these concepts are demonstrated in these various works. Students will analyze the problems in the materials and apply them to modern-day corporate work situations, reflecting upon how these works are practical and functional to successful management tasks, responsibilities, and leadership. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

HIS 335 Gender and Technology in Historical Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the connections between gender roles and technology from comparative and historical perspectives. Studying the past in this way sheds light on key global issues today. How does technology shape feminine and masculine identities in the developed world? What happens to preconceived notions of gender relations and gender identities when the developed world and developing world come into contact? This course focuses on the interaction between technology and gender in the age of globalization and is intended to be interdisciplinary and may begin with a dash of sociology or anthropology, dissecting gender roles in our world today. It will also examine the historical connections between gender roles and technology specifically in the United States. At the discretion of the instructor, topics to investigate may include the function of gender and technology in European exploration, European imperialism, and U.S. expansion. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course.

HIS 332 American Military History

American Military History is a multidimensional survey of the evolution of American Military organization, traditions methods from the colonial era to the onset of asymmetrical warfare in the Middle East. The course will present and analyze the key military events, leaders and strategists, including their influence on, and influence by, political considerations, global interests, public opinion as well as technological and economic factors. Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 or HIS 122 or HIS 125

HOR 370 Landscape Professional Practices

This is a course about the student's future as a horticulturist, landscape designer, contractor, a business professional and a citizen. Students will learn the skills required to start and manage a professional practice in their chosen field. The basics of business structure, insurance, contracts, and business investment will be addressed. Students will produce a cohesive business plan that incorporates defining their marketplace, developing a communication strategy, and cash-flow planning. They will also learn how to put together a portfolio and make effective use of technology to leverage the efficiency of their existing or proposed practice. Prerequisite(s): HOR 207

NUR 404 Nurse as Advocate and Change Agent

This course will enable students to synthesize new knowledge and develop a personal perspective on their future professional career in nursing. The current health care environment demands a nursing workforce that is theoretically sound, clinically adept, and politically aware. Topics to be discussed and explored include patient advocacy, political awareness and influence, power and oppression, institutional policy/personal goals, risk management, utilization and audit, and quality assurance. Additional topics may be added in response to new or emerging trends in nursing and health care. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 401

PHI 205 Ethics

An examination of ethical theories including relativism, determinism, and the concept of duty, and the application of these theories to contemporary problems. The place of ethics in relation to other branches of philosophy and the role of religion in shaping ethical theory are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

PHI 207 Business Ethics

An examination of ethical issues that arise in business and how these issues can be resolved. Various principles of ethical theory are analyzed and applied to particular business situations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

POL 110 Introduction to Legal Studies

This is a survey course designed to give the student a basic introduction to law beginning with the various schools of legal philosophical thought, criminal and civil law and procedure, and basic contract law. The course provides the student with an understanding and overview of how the American legal system functions including introducing students to the principles of law, the administration of the legal system, legal terminology, and the inter- relationship between politics, governmental structures, legal professionals and the functioning of the legal system.

POL 399 NYS Legislative Internship

For students participating in the full-time New York State Assembly and Senate Legislator Session Internship programs. Students work as staff members in their assigned State Legislator/Senator's office a minimum of 30 hours a week, conducting. During the internship, students participate in seminars, mock legislative sessions, and weekly research and written assignments. A written report on the internship experience is required of the student at the conclusion of the internship. Internships are open only to qualified junior and seniors with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher through a competitive selection process. Spring semester only. Note: Students must consult with the Campus Liaison Office to determine credit value to be assigned. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department Chair and Junior/Senior Level status and admission to NYS Assembly/Senate Internship Program.

PSY 330 Organizational Training and Development

An upper level offering, this course will provide a greater understanding of the theory, research, techniques, and current and future issues in the field of organizational training and development through an experimental learning approach. Topics shall include training systems, needs analysis, organization intervention, program evaluation, adult learning theory, cognitive issues, conditions for learning transfer, instructional techniques and current social and organizational issues in training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

SMT 440 Sport Management Internship

Supervised work experience in corporate settings, amateur and professional sport agencies, colleges and universities, and community sport organizations. Students assume leadership roles in various job-related activities and perform administrative tasks in support of activities under an experienced agency supervisor and faculty sponsor. No more than 15 credits may be earned from SMT 440 to SMT 443 and SMT 445 to SMT 448. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior level status, Department approval, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and SMT 110 with a grade of C or higher.

SMT 445 Sport Management Internship II

Supervised work experience in corporate settings, amateur and professional sport agencies, colleges and universities, and community sport organizations. Students assume leadership roles in various job-related activities and perform administrative tasks in support of activities under an experienced agency supervisor and faculty sponsor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned from SMT 440 to SMT 443 and SMT 445 to SMT 448. Prerequisite(s) required and Junior status or higher, Department approval, with a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher and SMT 110 with a grade of C or higher.

SOC 303 Sociology of Work and Occupation

This course will focus on the various dimensions of work and the social experience of making a living in the United States and other societies - past, present and future. We consider the large-scale developments related to a rapidly changing global economy, and the implications of these changes for individual workers. Topics discussed include the impact of technological innovations, changing occupational roles and subcultures, the development of the professions and professional ethics, gender roles and work roles, unemployment and underemployment, and the relationship between work and family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102